Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Night of the Living Dead

Look who showed up to haunt the School Board tonight: Terry Castellano... Beth Mason.... Tim Occhipinti....  BRAINS... BRAINS.... 

They need BRAINS...

Mike Russo... Mama Russo... Anthony Romano....  

BRAAAAAAAAAAINS....







Heaven help us... they won't stay dead!

21 comments:

  1. Mason brought her ape.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Vultures are circling.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Any time the circus comes to town, run in the opposite direction. If they come and you too the opposite stance you did the right thing.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Anti-Union Kids First originally "outsourced" adult education and no one said a word. Next, they outsourced some of the Advanced Placement courses at the high school to an online learning company, no one said a word. Now they have outsourced Transportation and people are starting to notice. Custodians and clerical workers are likely next. All because of their obsession of staying below the 2% cap so the school budget does not come up for a public vote.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's nice to have a fiscally-minded school board, instead of one that doles out dozens of free cellphones and splurges on steak dinners and trips to AC. The goal is the set outcome in the most cost-efficient way. Change is hard to accept, we know.

      Delete
    2. "best" outcome

      Delete
    3. Really? "Anti-Union"? Your attempt to fabricate some idiotic theory that the BOE majority is against unions is pathetic. The BOE majority is fighting for the politically weak families. You know, union families. The BOE is besieged by HoLa parents at meetings. Even worse, certain CC members and "our" mayor are too wimpy to do the right thing and support public education and the BOE members with whom they recently campaigned.

      As you clearly know, the BOE majority is pro-teacher, pro-education and anti-corruption. That last one is the reason those bozos showed up, to see if they could do an end-run around the barrier the BOE majority has created to make sure money is spent on our kids, their books and not on expensive dinners, other outrageous perks and jobs for friends. We cannot go back to those days.

      Thank you BOE majority. Keep up the good work.

      Delete
    4. Good Point Anon - "Even worse, certain CC members and "our" mayor are too wimpy to do the right thing and support public education and the BOE members with whom they recently campaigned."
      Sad but very true, The Mayor should not be opening our pockets to her pet projects.



      Sad but very true

      Delete
  5. Who opened the door and let them in ?

    ReplyDelete
  6. You act like outsourcing is the enemy. Reduced quality (or increased cost without a related increase in quality) of the education system is the enemy. Is adult education worse as a result of Kids-First Actions. What about Advanced Placement, any change in the number of kids in these classes, number of offerings, and results? How about transportation, is there any reason to believe an outsourced company will be worse at getting children too and from school than the district is? If it's just an issue that the union members are getting hurt by this but the kids aren't worse off, that seems like successful management, lowering costs while not negatively impacting outcomes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Participation in Adult Education is down 80% since Adult Education moved out of Hoboken and into the hands of the county. Does that represent a loss of quality? Hard to say. But there has been a clear loss of opportunity and accessibility. For 40 years Adult Ed took place at the high school with district teachers and administrators overseeing and it was a cost neutral operation (adults did pay a modest operating "tuition"). Now, Hoboken residents need to travel to Jersey City or North Bergen for GED classes, second language classes, business classes, and physical education classes. I do not consider that to be a positive change for taxpaying Hoboken residents.
      Is taking an online class for an Advanced Placement courses as good as taking a course with an actual teacher and with a classroom of peers. A fair amount of data indicates that in fact it is.
      As for transportation-- I would liken the situation to the outsourcing of food services which, to date, I do not believe shows any evidence of reduced costs since it was outsourced.
      So, its not clear that costs are lower, and it appears that outcomes may actually be slightly to strongly negative for students and adult learners.

      Delete
    2. I don't beleive that the adult ed was cost neutral? How could that be with the cost of the administrators, the teachers, the janitors, the cost of running the building. I can't beleive it that is was breaking even. I remember paying about $5 per class. No way was that covering all those costs to the distirct budget. It was nice for the community, but I bet some made money while the rest was charged to the school district budget.

      Toback has mentioned many times that the previous in house food service was losing $100,000's of dollars per year. The new service doesn't break even yet but was only down $20,000-30,000. Sounds better then $100,000 don't you think?

      Delete
    3. The old adult ed program cost the district about $5000 a year. I consider that cost neutral and less than a rounding error in a (then) $59+ million dollar budget. The cost of a course was much more than $5 but very reasonable.
      The Adult Ed program had an "open gym", the pool was available for lap swimming, there were GED classes, SAT prep classes, crafts, keyboard, computers, arts, yoga, and served as a means for adults in this town to get together in a place other than a bar.
      The accessibility, convenience, and affordability of a Hoboken based resident Adult Education program was a loss to the community.

      Delete
    4. Not a shot. I bet the administrator alone cost more than that! Then add on the teachers, the janitors keeping the building open and maintaing the gym and the pool. Sounds like lots of great offerings but your exagerating makes me suspicious.

      Delete
  7. yeah they suck! Imagine expoing the students to 1000's of AP courses online while only offering 20 in the school.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. exposure is not necessarily sound instruction...or do you want to argue about that too?

      Delete
    2. Did you actually read the comment? There ARE many AP courses. In the classroom. Online is an additional option with access to 1000's of additional classes.

      Delete
    3. Sorry. Both the number of AP courses and the number of AP students have both declined in the high school over the past 3 years. Online courses are being offered NOT for "exposing" students to "thousands" of AP courses but because there are too few students to justify a class.
      You want to keep playing? Cause I got more information.

      Delete
    4. I think you may be reading the chart upside down. AP only started a few years ago, therefore going from 0 to 20 classes. The online offerings are in addition to the in class offerings. but thanks for playing.

      Delete
  8. A village in Texas was missing its idiot. Arrivederci.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Just a disgruntled former employee that hasn't nothing better to do....

    http://www.hobokenschools.com/2014/03/hoboken-junior-senior-highschool-open.html

    ReplyDelete