Monday, December 2, 2013

Mason Gave Out 'Overnight Bags'?

left:  Were these bags of food left out overnight for Wednesday's (11/27/13) delivery?  right: To avoid contamination with Staphylococcus bacteria, the CDC recommends if food is to be stored longer than two hours, keep hot foods hot (over 140°F) and cold foods cold (40°F or under).

Yikes! 

A reader tells GA he saw the bags depicted on Beth Mason's Wednesday Facebook photo when he passed by the Mason Civic League "on Monday or Tuesday on a late-night dog walk."  

According to Perry Klaussen of Hoboken411,  "The packages included vegetables, potatoes, cranberry sauce, gravy, stuffing, corn bread, buscuits (sp) and other items for families in need to use them to make their dinners."

Care packages arrive to Mason Civic league for labeling?  What day?

Holy Botulism, Batman!

GA hadn't thought about when the Mason Civic League received the bags of food; I'd assumed they arrived there the day of delivery to "the needy".  It wasn't until a reader informed me he'd seen the bags there on Tuesday, did it occur to me that if true, unrefrigerated food had sat out in bags overnight ('overnight bags').

If Mason did give out 'overnight bags', what exactly was it that sat overnight without refrigeration?

And what was the room temperature during the period the food waited for labeling and photography?

If the goods were all canned, the off-the-shelf type, then there is no problem.  Were the "buscuits" canned?  Or baked?  Or the refrigerated Pillsbury-type that one bakes at home?  What about the vegetables?  Canned or fresh? What were the "other items" in the bag Klaussen refers to?  Anything containing eggs, which require refrigeration?  No meat, I presume...

The fact the 400 'care bags' were corralled for labeling and photography, which presumably delayed delivery to "those in need" and postponed refrigeration (as required) makes one wonder what the motivations of the 'charity' that used resources, time and money, to 'label' bags for the needy instead of expediting their delivery and using those resources to buy MORE food- instead of labels.

More about the Mason care packages, from another reader:

Those packages to fox hill (HHA in 5th wad) were hoarded by Masonites that live there and feed off her mula. No free turkeys to fox hill, but a couple of choice residents got one, and Garcia raffled off two!

Raffled off free turkeys?

I don't want to know.

9 comments:

  1. The bags should have gone from the market onto trucks then to the Homeless Shelter and HHA, not to sit around Beth Mason's office. Maybe if the stuff came straight from the market and delivered fresh the food choices would have been different. I don't believe Stack's turkeys came with bells, whistles or labels.

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  2. maybe mason put on the wrong kind of label

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  3. If there were perishables in those bags this is yet ANOTHER new low as the elderly and people who are immune-compromised may become seriously ill or even die. Anyone experiencing gas, bloating, diarrhea and intestinal distress should send their doctor's bills to BM headquarters.

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    1. BBM: Botulism-Betty Mason.

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  4. 1. props. Proper recognition. I give him props for sleepig with Venessa ... Props, short for Propers, -Don't forget that the entire word "propers" is used in the song ...

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    Replies
    1. Joke:
      1. Something said or done to evoke laughter or amusement, especially an amusing story with a punch line.
      2. A mischievous trick; a prank.
      3. An amusing or ludicrous incident or situation.
      4. Informal
      a. Something not to be taken seriously; a triviality: The accident was no joke.
      b. An object of amusement or laughter; a laughingstock: His loud tie was the joke of the office.

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    2. Anon @ 3:22 PM, you know, I was kiddin' around.

      Anon @ 4:20 PM, props to ya!

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  5. If the groceries were left out overnight then we're not talking about fresh food. It's stuff that she wouldn't eat, but is good enough for "the needy."

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  6. Bet the label was fresh!

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